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So far Blue Vapours has created 16 blog entries.

Joint Policy Briefing: Australia’s approach to private/community sponsorship of refugees

4 December 2017 Joint Policy Briefing: Australia’s approach to private/community sponsorship of refugees

We are leading organisations in the refugee and humanitarian sector and have prepared this joint policy briefing to suggest ways in which the government can enable members of the Australian community to play a greater role in helping Australia respond to the global refugee crisis, which is now unprecedented in scale.

Our agencies were among the dozens of organisations including Australian businesses, philanthropic organisations and civil society groups who recently gathered to discuss the future of private refugee sponsorship in Australia, with the overarching goal of enhancing Australia’s response to the global refugee crisis… Download the full report

By | December 4th, 2017|Front - Hot Topics, Front - News, Press Releases|

Media Release: Australian Christian Churches stand in unity for compassion, justice and dignity for refugees in Manus Island, PNG.

24 November 2017 Please note this is a joint media release between the National Council of Churches in Australia, Act for Peace and the Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce.

Australian Christian Churches stand in unity for compassion, justice and dignity for refugees in Manus Island, PNG.

The National Council of Churches in Australia, Act for Peace and the Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce stand together to bear witness to the suffering that Australia’s bipartisan refugee policy in regard to offshore processing, has caused.

 We mourn the loss of justice for those refugees in PNG who are willing to put their own bodies in danger as the last cry of despair in the search for a safe future.

 We pray for Australian Government leadership who may not have envisaged such suffering in re-enacting offshore processing, but who now cannot shy from the reality of the damage that has been done.

 We stand with the Manus Island and PNG people who are facing the presumption that they are not a safe and hospitable nation and cannot be trusted to host these vulnerable men.

We plead that if the men are to remain in PNG for now, that force is not used to relocate them and that the Australian Government contributes to securing their dignity and safety.

We request that the Australian Government ensure the processing of re-settlement for these men occurs safely, swiftly and with the greatest regard to family unity.

National Council of Churches in Australia President Bishop Phillip Huggins:

“It is difficult to understand how a nation like Australia has found itself in this situation.  Other countries face far greater challenges with hosting refugees and struggling with unexpected arrivals.  Australia’s current situation has put enormous, unnecessary ethical pressure on all involved and needs to be resolved peacefully and swiftly”. 

 

Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce Chair, the Very Rev’d Dr. Peter Catt:

“We know that PNG has issues of concern for its own population and its nation.  For the context on Manus Island we recognise this is not the fault of the refugees, the PNG locals or their Government.  Australia wanted a quick fix to a situation which has turned into a protracted and harmful experience for many.”

 

Act for Peace Executive Director Ms. Janet Cousens

“There are many lessons to learn from this situation that show us that even with the intention to save lives at sea or reduce human trafficking, that damage and suffering has still been caused to many people.”

 

Media inquiries may be directed to:

 

 

Bishop Phillip Huggins

President

National Council of Churches in Australia

0418799515

 

The Very Rev’d Dr. Peter Catt

Chair

Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce

0404052494

 

Caz Coleman

Executive Officer

Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce

0411876226

 

 

 

Caz Coleman

Executive Officer

Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce

0411876226

ccoleman@actforpeace.org.au

Media Release: Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce urge adherence to international measures on the use of force and securement for Manus Island transfer.

November 14 2017 The Australian Churches’ Refugee Taskforce (ACRT) maintains the belief that those whom sought Australia’s protection, and were transferred to Nauru and Manus Island PNG, have suffered enough.  The failed attempt to regionally re-settlement this group for more than four years has resulted in personal suffering, deaths and international condemnation from the United Nations.  The imperative now is to secure a safe place for re-settlement, or at the least, a safe place to continue the search for a sustainable re-settlement option.

However, in the instance that the Australian Government refuses to bring these men to safety, the ACRT urges PNG to uphold international measures, through various United Nations international instruments, to avoid using force to coerce, remove or evict vulnerable people from their place of stay.

Taskforce Chair, the Very Rev’d Dr. Peter Catt:
“We support the PNG Government in the directive of their own security forces not to use force on the refugees who are refusing to leave the detention centre.  Where fear drives a refusal to relocate for the refugees and where a history of suffering is embedded in this fear, we urge the PNG Government to continue to avoid the use of force to relocate refugees to alternative locations.”

Many ACRT member churches have partner churches in PNG and have concerns about the way PNG is being cast as a violent and uruly nation in response to the refugees residing on Manus Island.

Taskforce Chair, the Very Rev’d Dr. Peter Catt:
“We know that PNG has issues of concern for its population and its nation.  Australia’s history in PNG is a contributing factor to the challenges and poverty in PNG.  But for the context on Manus Island we recognise this is not the fault of the refugees, the PNG locals or their Government.  Australia wanted a quick fix to a situation which has turned into a protracted and harmful experience for many.  The situation has put enormous ethical pressure on all involved and needs to be resolved peacefully.”

The ACRT urges the Australian Government to address the fears of the refugees who remain in the former detention centre.  Without a resolution that either involves immediate transfer to Australia or heightened security, food and housing safety in the alternative accommodation, fears for the men’s health and wellbeing escalate each day.

There should be no reason that additional measures to address the men’s concerns cannot be put in place to resolve the short term situation.

Media inquiries may be directed to:
The Very Rev’d Dr. Peter Catt
Chair of the Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce
0404052494

Caz Coleman
ACRT Executive Officer
0411876226

Media Release: ACRT acknowledge refugee fear as centre closes on Manus Island PNG

2 November 2017

The ACRT recognises that the offshore processing arrangements when first proposed by the Expert Panel in 2012, were never designed to be protracted in Nauru or on Manus Island PNG. The aim was always for safe re-settlement regionally and was clearly articulated in the Expert Panel report to create such protection.

Taskforce Chair, the Very Rev’d Dr. Peter Catt:
“The outcome of offshore detention for a second time in Australia’s history has created a serious breach of human rights and a devastating fear for those who are experiencing it. There are times when we have to face that harm has been done and that restitution is necessary.”

Whilst any durable solution for those on Nauru and in Manus Island through the US deal is welcome, there is no reason such arrangements cannot proceed in Australia. Achieving safety is the core purpose of the Refugee Convention. The situation on Manus Island PNG is clearly not safe for the refugees living there. Rather than blaming the local Manus island residents, it must be acknowledged that Australian Government leaders over the past 4 years have failed to recognise the dangers of warehousing refugees in communities and countries who have their own disadvantage, struggles and conflicts.

Taskforce Chair, the Very Rev’d Dr. Peter Catt:
“There is a strong system in place to prevent boats coming to Australia, so achieving safe re-settlement for those in Nauru and the Manus Island reception centre is an imperative. The level of harm may not have been originally intended by the Expert Panel in their recommendations, or by either side of Government, but it has happened. It is enough and we must learn from this.”

It is time to end attempts to abrogate Australia’s responsibility to care for and process those seeking our protection. Upholding Australia’s own responsibilities and working within the region to create sustainable solutions is the only way to achieve safety and dignity for each person requesting protection.

Media inquiries may be directed to:
The Very Rev’d Dr. Peter Catt
Chair of the Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce
0404052494

Media Release: ACRT affirms Liberal MP’s call to find durable solutions for refugees and close Nauru and Manus.

August 17th 2017: The Australian Churches’ Refugee Taskforce (ACRT) applauds backbench MP Russell Broadbent for speaking in parliament about the need to resolve the situation on Nauru and Manus.  

Quoting the author and journalist David Marr, Mr Broadbent pointed to Marr’s comment that there could not be a better service to Christ than for Christians to fight for those Australia has imprisoned in Nauru and Manus.

The Australian Churches’ Refugee Taskforce has worked collaboratively with other agencies across Australia for four years to call for the closure of offshore detention.  The ACRT holds the position that neither Nauru nor Manus, is a durable solution in relation to the integration of refugees in either country.

Taskforce Chair, the Very Rev’d Dr Peter Catt:

“We believe that any durable solution for those on Nauru and Manus through the US deal is welcome.  However, we firmly believe that Australia is the place people should have been processed and settled in the first instance.”

The offshore processing arrangements when first proposed by the Expert Panel in 2012, were never designed for integration into Nauru or Manus.  The aim was always for safe re-settlement and is clearly articulated in the report.

“Offshore processing has failed for the second time.  Neither Nauru nor Manus has the capacity or cultural readiness for integration of the refugees who were sent there.  People in both locations continue to live in fear with very few options for safety, dignity and economic sustainability.  Durable solutions must be found in either the US, Australia or another safe location.”

Mr Broadbent’s words in parliament reflect the faithful stance of the ACRT in the call to turn towards the suffering of those on Nauru and Manus and to create safety and dignity.  Australia has tried offshore processing twice now in two decades.  Both attempts have failed to create durable solutions and avoid suffering and permanent harm to those seeking Australia’s protection.

It is time to end attempts to abrogate Australia’s responsibility to care for and process those seeking our protection.  Working within the region to create sustainable solutions and focusing on community based care arrangements, is the only way to uphold the safety and dignity of each person requesting protection.

Media inquiries may be directed to:

The Very Rev’d Dr, Peter Catt
Chair of the Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce
0404 052 494

Churches appeal to Government to show compassion in the face of violence on Manus Island over Easter

15 April 2017: A Media Release from the Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce.

The Australian Churches’ Refugee Taskforce has condemned the violence that erupted on Manus Island on the evening of Good Friday, and calls for the camp to be evacuated. Read the full statement here.

 

Church, aid and human rights groups call on government to evacuate the refugee camps

It’s not just President Donald Trump complaining about an agreement between the Australian and American governments to move twelve hundred and fifty refugees from Nauru and Manus Island to the US. A coalition of 70 church, human rights and aid groups wants an end to the refugees’ uncertainty over whether they’ll ever get to America. Listen to the full story from RN.

By | February 13th, 2017|Latest News, TV and Radio|

Day of Prayer and Fasting for Refugees: March 5

In October 2016 the leaders of Churches met for conversation and to support each other.  At this meeting they decided that the first Sunday of Lent, 5 March 2017, will be a Day of Prayer and Fasting for Refugees and Asylum Seekers.

The NCCA has put together resources to assist with reflection, prayer, reading and study.  These documents represent a collection of some of the wonderful resources that have been gathered from our Churches. Find out more!

By | February 7th, 2017|Front - Hot Topics|

Enough! Declare an amnesty today!

A Media Release from the Anglican Diocese of Melbourne. Given the likely failure of the refugee arrangement with the United States, Australian Prime minister Malcolm Turnbull should announce an amnesty and bring the asylum seekers on Nauru and Manus to Australia. Read the full release.

Parliamentary Code of Race Ethics

20 years after the first emergence of Pauline Hanson, the 45th Parliament has again become dominated by divisive race politics. Recent weeks have seen words used by the immigration minister as bullets to reignite a war against immigrants, and the Taskforce has taken action in response.

We have been encouraging all federal senators and MPs to sign a 2016 version of the Parliamentary Code of Race Ethics, first introduced in 1996 by Qld Senators Margaret Reynolds and John Woodley (view the 1996 document and its signatories here).

To date, all members of the ALP caucus have signed the 2016 version, which aims to hold our elected members to a code of conduct which includes making a commitment to telling the truth, and representing all constituents, regardless of race.

Read the full 2016 Parliamentary Code of Ethics and ask your local MP and your senate representatives to please sign up.

As of today, Mr Shorten has written to Mr Turnbull asking him to present it to the coalition party room, and we eagerly await Mr Turnbull’s response.

By | November 28th, 2016|Front - Campaigns, Race and Politics|